Is Ketosis Healthy? Learn Why

Yes, ketosis is definitely healthy. During ketosis, the body burns a lot of fat to make ketones. Ketones are an alternative fuel to glucose. Studies show that ketosis provides a wide range of health benefits like weight loss, epilepsy control, and diabetes prevention [1].

Being in ketosis also increases energy levels, mental acuity, well-being, and longevity. Still, some worry that being in ketosis can be dangerous. Below, we explain why there's no reason to hold onto such fears.

Understand Why Ketosis is Healthy

Ketosis is a natural metabolic state. And because it is natural, it is healthy to be in ketosis. Here are three main reasons why ketosis is healthy.

Ketosis enhances fat burning

Many people struggle with excess weight because their bodies have become metabolically inflexible. Metabolic flexibility is the ability to switch between burning sugar and burning fat. It is extremely important for metabolic health. When you're in ketosis, your body burns more fat than ever, helping boost metabolic flexibility.

Ketosis stabilizes blood glucose

Diets high in refined carbohydrates wreak havoc on your blood glucose. Ketosis and ketogenic diets are proven to stabilize blood glucose levels over the long term [2]. Having stable blood glucose levels is linked to a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and inflammation.

Ketosis provides antioxidant protection

Studies show that ketones reduce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) [3]. If left unchecked, ROS cause something called "oxidative stress," a toxic state linked to heart attack, ADHD, depression, inflammation, and cancer.

One reason ketosis may be considered unhealthy is that people confuse it with ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis is a medical emergency seen in people with untreated diabetes, starvation, and long-term alcohol abuse. It does not happen by following a ketogenic diet.

To learn more about ketosis, make sure you also check out our articles about the 6 Benefits of ketosis besides weight loss and additional benefits of the keto diet.

References

  1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3826507/
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29269731
  3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5981249/

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