Food & Nutrition

Carbs in Strawberries & Other Nutritional Info

Carbs in Strawberries & Other Nutritional Info

Like most berries, strawberries are low in carbohydrates. A 100g serving contains around 5-7g net carbs on average. The same serving will also give you 2g of fiber and enough vitamin C to help you meet your total daily requirements for this nutrient.

Because strawberries are so low in carbs and also nutritious and healthful, they're one of the very few fruits to be allowed on a low-carb and ketogenic diet. Learn more about strawberries, including about nutritional profile and health benefits in the lines below.


How Many Carbs in Strawberries?

Strawberries are over 90% water, while most of their dry weight is carbohydrates. The exact number of carbs you'll get from strawberries will depend mostly on portion size but also strawberry ripeness. A typical serving size containing 100g of commercially grown, raw strawberries will give you between 5 and 7 grams of net carbohydrates [1].

Most of these net carbs in strawberries are simple sugars, with glucose and fructose being the predominant types. Fructose does not acutely raise blood glucose, and in small quantities is not bad for health. Strawberries also contain a moderate amount of fiber, and most of their fiber is of the insoluble kind [2]. Insoluble fiber adds bulk to stool and helps keep you regular.

However, studies show that carbs in strawberries can vary greatly depending on fruit ripeness as well [3, 4]. The riper the fruit, the higher its carb content. You'll know a strawberry has more carbs by its sweetness. A slightly tart berry is underripe and will have fewer carbs. But nonetheless, these differences are very small, so strawberries will always have 5-7g of carbs per 100g of fresh produce.  


How Many Calories in Strawberries?

Because strawberries are mostly water, they provide very few calories. A 100g serving will give you only 32 calories, almost all coming from the small amount of carbs in strawberries. A meager amount comes from the 0.7g of protein and 0.3g of fat in strawberries.

Being such a low-calorie food, strawberries make for a perfect weight-loss treat. On a keto diet, combining low-calorie strawberries with a high-fat ingredient such as whipped cream makes for a ketogenic dessert that can also promote weight loss.


woman-hands-holding-strawberries-on-a-white-background

Nutritional Value of Strawberries

Strawberries are a good source of fiber, with a 100g serving providing 8% of the daily value (DV) for this nutrient. These berries also provide 59 mg of vitamin C, which is almost 100% of the DV for this important nutrient and antioxidant.  They also provide a small amount of vitamin K, folate, and other B vitamins (less than 5% DV).

When it comes to essential minerals, strawberries only provide negligible amounts of calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, zinc, and copper (1-4% DV). They're only rich in Manganese, providing 0.4mg or 19% of the DV for this mineral. Manganese is important for a wide range of functions such as bone formation, calcium absorption, and carbohydrate metabolism, to name a few.

All in all, strawberries cannot be regarded as a nutrient-dense food. But they are a good source of fiber, vitamin C, and manganese. They will contribute to your daily needs for other nutrients but to a small extent.


Nutrition Info

Raw Strawberries (100g)

Calories

32

Total Carbohydrates

7.7g

Fiber

2.0g

Protein

0.7g

Total Fat

0.3g

Vitamin C

58.8mg

Vitamin B6

0.0mg

Folate

24mcg

Vitamin A  

12 IU

Manganese

0.4mg

Selenium

0.4mcg


Can You Eat Strawberries on The Keto Diet?

Yes, definitely. Strawberries are a low-carb fruit because they contain less than 10g net carbs per 100g. They're one of the most frequently recommended keto diet fruits for this very reason. Another reason strawberries are good for you on keto is their high vitamin C content. Vitamin C is difficult to obtain on a low-carb diet if you don't plan it carefully.

Strawberries and other berries along with low-carb vegetables like spinach, celery, cabbage, and cucumbers can also help boost your fiber intake on keto. Again, because keto is a low-carb diet, it can be difficult to get enough fiber. Including plenty of low-carb plant foods can help with this.


Health Benefits of Strawberries

All berries are important sources of compounds that, while not contributing directly to nutrition, exert a positive impact on human health. These compounds are often referred to as antioxidants and include a wide range of phytochemicals. However, some nutrients function as antioxidants as well. Antioxidants are compounds that prevent the damage of cells caused by free radicals and, in this way, prevent disease states.


Carbs in Strawberries & Other Nutritional Info_infographic_1

Strawberries, in particular, are rich in antioxidant chemicals such as vitamin C and the phytochemicals ellagic acid, anthocyanins, quercetin, and catechin [5]. Researchers believe these compounds help prevent oxidative stress and its consequences such as inflammation, hyperglycemia, and cancer. Other notable benefits of strawberry antioxidants include:


Atherosclerosis prevention

Atherosclerosis is hardening of the arteries caused by imbalanced blood lipids. It's a known risk factor for heart attack and stroke but that can be prevented with diet and lifestyle changes. A study on people with metabolic syndrome found that consuming strawberries improves blood lipids and, in this way, reduces atherosclerosis risk [6].


Pain relief

A study published on obese adults with knee osteoarthritis found that strawberries reduce inflammation and pain in the knee [7]. This could mean that strawberries are a natural pain reliever. Their effect on inflammation and subsequently pain may very likely be due to its powerful antioxidants.


Improved folate status

Strawberries contain a modest amount of folate. But despite this, a study from 2009 found that these berries can help improve folate status when consumed regularly [8]. Folate is a type of B vitamin that is important in preventing anemia, birth defects, and in normal DNA production. Folate deficiency is fairly common, so paying special focus to your intake of this nutrient is a good idea.


How to Eat Strawberries on Keto?

Strawberries are a pretty versatile fruit, so there are many ways to incorporate them into your keto diet. Consider the following tips for adding strawberries to your keto meals:


1. Make smoothies

There are hundreds of keto smoothie recipes out there and many include strawberries. You can blend these berries with yogurt, avocado, nut butters, or almond milk. Make sure to use keto sweeteners or, even better, let the strawberries sweeten your smoothie.


2. Strawberries and cream

This is a simple old-time classic that we all know and low. Again, make sure to sweeten the cream with a low-carb sweetener and add vanilla extract or any other flavoring of your liking.


3. Strawberries with Greek yogurt

For a quick lunch, snack, or breakfast, add strawberries to a cup of Greek yogurt. Optionally, you can sprinkle over some flax seeds, chia seeds, cinnamon, or sugar-free maple syrup. It's an easy way to get satiating protein along with the health benefits of strawberries.


Takeaways

Strawberries definitely have their place in a keto diet. They provide around 5g net carbs per 100g and are also a good source of fiber, vitamin C, manganese, and even folate. Researchers also found strawberries to have many powerful phytochemicals that could help you avoid chronic diseases if you make strawberries (and other berries) your daily staple.

Make sure to keep track of your macros intake when adding any carb-containing food to your daily meals, including strawberries. Strawberries can still contribute to your daily carb intake, especially if you eat more than one cup. It's best to add them to different keto meals to avoid overeating on strawberries while eating enough fat and protein.


References:

  1. United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. Full Report (All Nutrients), 45181390 Whole Strawberries. March 2018 - https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/45181390?fgcd=&manu=&format=&count=&max=25&offset=&sort=default&order=asc&qlookup=WHOLE+STRAWBERRIES%2C+UPC%3A+070038355922&ds=&qt=&qp=&qa=&qn=&q=&ing=
  2. Slavin JL, Lloyd B. Health Benefits of Fruits and Vegetables. 2012 July - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3649719/
  3. Mahmood T et al. Compositional Variation in Sugars and Organic Acids at Different Maturity Stages in Selected Small Fruits from Pakistan. 2012 January - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3291965/
  4. Macías-Rodríguez L, Quero E, López MG. Carbohydrate differences in strawberry crowns and fruit (Fragaria x ananassa) during plant development. 2002 May - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12010004
  5. Basu A et al. Strawberry as a functional food: an evidence-based review. 2014 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24345049
  6. Basu A et al. Strawberries decrease atherosclerotic markers in subjects with metabolic syndrome. 2010 July - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20797478
  7. Schell J et al. Strawberries Improve Pain and Inflammation in Obese Adults with Radiographic Evidence of Knee Osteoarthritis. 2017 August - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28846633
  8. Tulipani S, Mezzetti B, Battino M. Impact of strawberries on human health: insight into marginally discussed bioactive compounds for the Mediterranean diet. 2009 September - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19689836

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